ANALYTICAL THINKING or F.U.D?

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SHORT BLOG POST VERSION:
I get a lot of satisfaction from teaching others the FAIR methodology. But equally satisfying is me knowing that I am helping build a culture of analytical thinking for both the class participant and our employer.

LONG BLOG POST VERSION:
This past week I had the privilege of teaching a three-day BASIC FAIR course at my employer. This is the second FAIR course I have taught and I can honestly state that I learned a lot about my company and the course participants; most of which I will be interacting with in the coming months in a consulting capacity.

Teaching the FAIR methodology is very challenging and rewarding. Because people’s preconceived notions of risk are challenged within minutes of being introduced to FAIR – there is no shortage of AH-HAH moments for them as well as no shortage of the instructor being stretched to unimaginable limits to take their examples and questions and view them through the lens of FAIR. I have walked away from both classes feeling like I learned more then they did.

I am currently reading “The Flaw of Averages” by Sam L. Savage. I highly recommend this book for a seasoned information risk practitioner. I will probably reference the book may times in future posts but for this post I want to talk about a sentence or two from Chapter 11; page 85 (hardcover). Savage references Well Fargo in 1997 and how they ‘maintained a culture of analytical thinking’.

So ask yourself this: Does my information risk management program instill a culture of analytical thinking or one of F.U.D. (Fear, Uncertainty & Doubt)?

The FAIR methodology when used correctly will force the practitioner to be analytical. But for an entire information risk management program to require all of its members to go through this training is telling of the culture we are creating. And guess what? This analytical thinking is not limited to our information risk management program. Our practitioners have to be able to explain their risk analysis to those individuals (IT & Business) accountable for the risk and responsible for the mitigation activity.

In summary, I get a lot of satisfaction from teaching others the FAIR methodology. But equally satisfying is me knowing that I am helping build a culture of analytical thinking for both the class participant and our employer.

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