Deconstructing Some HITECH Hype

A few days ago I began analyzing some model output and noticed that the amount of loss exposure for ISO 27002 section “Communications and Operations Management” had increased by 600% in a five week time frame. It only took a few seconds to zero-in on an issue that was responsible for the increase.

The issue was related to a gap with a 3rd party of which there was some Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH) fine exposure. The estimated HITECH fines were really LARGE. Large in the sense that the estimates:

a.    Did not pass the sniff test
b.    Could not be justified based off any documented fines / or statutes.
c.    From a simulation perspective were completely skewing the average simulated expected loss value for the scenario itself.

I reached out to better understand the rationale of the practitioner who performed the analysis and after some discussion we were in agreement that some additional analysis was warranted to accurately represent assumptions as well as refine loss magnitude estimates – especially for potential HITECH fines. About 10 minutes of additional information gathering yielded valuable information.

In a nutshell, the HITECH penalty structure is a tiered system that takes into consideration the nature of the data breach, the fine per violation and maximum amounts of fines for a given year. See below (the tier summary is from link # 2 at the bottom of this post; supported by links # 1 and 3):

Tier A is for violations in which the offender didn’t realize he or she violated the Act and would have handled the matter differently if he or she had. This results in a $100 fine for each violation, and the total imposed for such violations cannot exceed $25,000 for the calendar year.

Tier B is for violations due to reasonable cause, but not “willful neglect.” The result is a $1,000 fine for each violation, and the fines cannot exceed $100,000 for the calendar year.

Tier C is for violations due to willful neglect that the organization ultimately corrected. The result is a $10,000 fine for each violation, and the fines cannot exceed $250,000 for the calendar year.

Tier D is for violations of willful neglect that the organization did not correct. The result is a $50,000 fine for each violation, and the fines cannot exceed $1,500,000 for the calendar year.

Given this information and the nature of the control gap – one can quickly determine the penalty tier as well as estimate fine amounts. The opportunity cost to gather this additional information was minimal and the benefits of the additional analysis will result  in not only more accurate and defendable analysis – but also spare the risk practitioner from what would have been certain scrutiny from other IT risk leaders and possibly business partner allegations of IT Risk Management once again “crying wolf”.

Key Take-Away(s)

1.    Perform sniff tests on your analysis; have others review your analysis.
2.    There is probably more information then you realize about the problem space you are dealing with.
3.    Be able to defend assumptions and estimates that you make.
4.    Become the “expert” about the problem space not the repeater of information that may not be valid to begin with.

Links / References associated with this post:

1.    HIPAA Enforcement Rule ref. HITECH <- lots of legalese
2.    HITECH Summary <- less legalese
3.    HITECH Act scroll down to section 13410 for fine information <-lots of legalese
4.    Actual instance of a HITECH-related fine
5.    Interesting Record Loss Threshold Observation; Is 500 records the magic number?

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One Response to Deconstructing Some HITECH Hype

  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Invensys CISP and joviann , Chris Hayes. Chris Hayes said: Do you have #RSAC Postpartum depression? Need help easing back into the real world? Quick post on HITECH fines. http://bit.ly/gClaTB […]

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